Garnier: the first and only L'Oréal-owned brand to be certified cruelty-free

Garnier: the first and only L'Oréal-owned brand to be certified cruelty-free

Garnier is now officially cruelty-free following certification by Cruelty Free International.

Cruelty Free International’s Leaping Bunny Certification has granted Garnier the official cruelty-free status.

The animal advocacy and certification group are well-trusted and more than 1000 brands all over the world feature their logo on a variety of cruelty-free products.

The 18-month certification process consisted of an extensive investigation into ingredients, raw materials, and supply chains. Garnier is the first and only L’Oréal-owned brand to seek official cruelty-free status. Go, Garnier!

Cruelty Free International’s Leaping Bunny Certification has granted Garnier the official cruelty-free status.

“To be officially approved by Cruelty Free International under the Leaping Bunny program is a real milestone and was always an important part of our Green Beauty mission,” said global brand president Adrien Koskas.

“Today Garnier takes another green step towards becoming a fully committed, truly sustainable, and transparent brand that delivers green beauty for all of us,” he added.

Even the band didn’t have the official certification it has been marketing vegan and cruelty-free for some time.

In general, Garnier is marketed as a “green beauty” brand, but up until relatively recently, didn’t have a clear policy and since 2013 stopped testing on animals.

Ethical Consumer also notes that L’Oreal lobbied against the EU’s 2003 ban on animal testing, despite the company’s claim to have been at the forefront of alternative methods for more than 30 years.

The French cosmetics giant has invested €1 billion so far into its sustainability roadmap,

The French cosmetics giant has invested €1 billion so far into its sustainability roadmap, with 4,000 researchers dedicated to realizing its goals by 2030. Reaching those targets is next.

While the cosmetics industry faces tighter regulations on ingredients than fashion does on textiles, its ventures into sustainability have been comparatively limited, focusing on single issues such as animal testing or deforestation connected to palm oil.

L’Oréal itself has also published its own sustainability program, titled “L’Oréal For The Future,” which details ongoing efforts to become fully sustainable by 2030.

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