What can apple cider vinegar do for your skin? What can apple cider vinegar do for your skin?

What can apple cider vinegar do for your skin?

Apple cider vinegar has been long considered a key ingredient for weight loss, but it has recently become one of the dearest items when it comes to natural skincare.

Lately, a lot of dermatologists and cosmetologists have been debating about the benefits of this ingredient, which you probably have at home. It has been said that apple cider vinegar will make your skin look brighter. You can easily imagine why someone would be completely ok with smelling like a salad.

Even skincare experts say that apple cider vinegar has plenty of benefits for your skin. Before you run around your kitchen to pour it on your face, let’s see what this is all about.

What is apple cider vinegar?

What is apple cider vinegar?

Apple cider vinegar, or ACV, is derived from apples after a process of fermentation. When applied topically, it can act as a toner, but also as a spot treatment.

According to Joshua Zeichner, MD, Mount Sinai Hospital director of cosmetic and clinical research, “[Apple cider vinegar] naturally has an acidic pH and can help balance the pH of the outer skin layer.”

What can it do for your skin?

What can it do for your skin?

There is still not enough evidence about the benefits of apple cider benefits when used topically, but it could potentially have the following benefits:

It balances your skin pH: as apple cider vinegar can balance the pH of your outer skin layer, it keeps looking bright and functioning optimally, generating the right amount of oil.

It exfoliates: ACV contains malic acid, which works well on acne-prone skin, allowing to exfoliate to unclog pores.

It improves hyperpigmentation: ACV might be a great option for clearing up hyperpigmentation issues. Malic acid is also known for decreasing the production of melanin, ultimately responsible for skin pigmentation.

Are there any side effects?

Are there any side effects?

As malic acid is milder than most AHAs, it is presumably suitable for any skin type. However, besides malic acid, apple cider vinegar has other components that can be irritating or that can dry your skin. Also, some studies show that acetic acid, also found in ACV, can cause chemical burns. An easy way to avoid this is by diluting it, but before you get too excited about this, it’s best if you check with your dermatologist.
 

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