Benefits and myths of swimming!

These are the myths of swimming to debunk right now

There are a lot of myths around swimming, but here we are to put them to the test and see if they can be confirmed or not.

Swimming is usually listed among the top activities and there is a good reason for this: it's one single practice that has as many benefits as you can possibly think of and it doesn't require much equipment: a bathing suit, some goggles and, of course, a swimming pool. If you are looking for an optimal way to work your entire body, then you should know that swimming is, probably, your best shot.

Benefits of swimming

1- It works out your whole body

And this is not just a saying! One of the biggest benefits of swimming is that it truly works your entire body, head to toe. For starters, it increases your heart rate without stressing your body, it tones your muscles, it builds strength and endurance. Depending on the stroke you chose, you can work a whole different set of muscles, but no matter which one you chose, you are always using most of your body muscles to swim. Among the possibilities, you have breaststroke, backstroke, sidestroke, butterfly, and freestyle.

2- It works your insides, too

Swimming is the best cardiovascular training there is. It makes your heart and your lungs strong. It's so good that, according to some research, it can even help lower your blood pressure and control your blood sugar.

Swimming, as strong practice as it is, is a very low impact activity. This makes it the go-to option for people with joint pain, arthritis, or other related injuries. Swimming may even help reduce some of your pain or improve your recovery from an injury. One study showed that people with osteoarthritis reported significant reductions in joint pain and stiffness, and experienced less physical limitation after engaging in activities like swimming and cycling.

Swimming is usually listed among the top activities and there is a good reason for this: it's one single practice that has as many benefits as you can possibly think of and it doesn't require much equipment:

3- Is a great option for people with asthma

The humid environment of indoor pools makes swimming a great activity for people with asthma. Not only that but breathing exercises associated with the sport, like holding your breath, may help you expand your lung capacity and gain control over your breathing.

However, you might want to talk to your doctor about the chemicals usually used to treat pools, because you might be better off if you go to a pool that uses saltwater instead of chlorine.

4- It's beneficial for people with Multiple Sclerosis (MS)

Water makes the limbs buoyant, helping to support them during exercise. This is perfect for people who suffer from MS. Water also provides gentle resistance, so it's the perfect combination to help relieve pain and improve symptoms like fatigue and depression.

5- It improves your sleep quality

Swimming may have the power to help you sleep better at night. In a study on older adults with insomnia, participants reported both a boost in quality of life and sleep after engaging in regular aerobic exercise.

These are only a few of the many benefits of swimming because this activity has it all. Are you ready to sign up for swimming classes to start off the new year?

There are a lot of myths around swimming, but here we are to put them to the test and see if they can be confirmed or not.

Swimming may have the power to help you sleep better at night.

The most common myths about swimming, debunked!

Swimming after eating

How many times has your mother told you this? This one is repeated generation after generation and we all go through life thinking that if we swim right after eating we will get a cramp and drown or that our blood will rush to our stomach, leaving our limbs weak and making us unable to swim. However, this is a myth. While it’s true that some athletes may get a cramp from overeating too close to swimming time, a small snack will give you the energy you need to perform while in the water.

Most swimmers can safely enjoy a small sandwich or protein bar before hopping into the water. In fact, ensuring you keep your blood sugar up is much preferable to suffering a dizzy spell in the water due to hunger. So, don’t go out for spicy wings and then hop straight in the pool, but feel free to have a small snack ahead of time.

"You have to hold your breath!"

This is something we all do by instinct but, as a matter of fact, having to hold your breath while swimming is a myth. It actually works against your natural rhythms when swimming. It’s better to breathe out or blow bubbles when underwater, preparing your lungs to fill with air when you surface again. This means you won’t have to take care of an exhale and inhale in the short time that your face exits the water, as this is inefficient.

There is a certain body type for swimming

Coaches usually say that they hear this very often. “I’m too skinny!” or “I’m a sinker, not a floater” are some common phrases that people use to blame their body type when swimming is difficult. The truth is that with the right technique, anyone can learn to swim. Building your strength, stroke technique, and ability to relax and float in water has nothing to do with your body type. So, don’t worry about it!

If you don't move fast, you won't go fast

Now here's a myth that is partially true. If you stroke faster, you may go more quickly. However, it’s also misleading because this is only part of the equation. Your stroke technique and length also play essential roles in your swimming speed. Many people incorrectly put all of their efforts into moving faster, rather than improving their stroke. With the help of a capable, experienced swimming coach, you can refine your stroke and achieve your best times.

"I don't sweat so I don't need to drink water"

Swimming might take your breath away, but it might take a while before it makes you feel thirsty. However, you should hydrate yourself. Just the same way you have a water bottle beside you while practicing any sport, you should do the same while swimming. Hydrating after your practice is, actually, really important! Naturally, after swimming you feel like you could eat the whole world —this might be because you need to hydrate, first!

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