These are the right proteins you should take for your vegan diet

These are the right proteins you should take for your vegan diet

Legumes, nuts, and some foods such as mushrooms are other sources of vegetable protein that, along with soybeans, are the basis of a balanced vegan menu

In the world, there are more and more people who decide to opt for a vegan diet, either for ethical, environmental, or nutritional reasons. One of the main criticisms towards those who choose this way of eating is their lack of protein for not consuming products or derivatives of animal origin (meat, chicken, fish, eggs, honey, dairy, etc.).

However, the vegan diet can be the same or even more nutritious than other types of diets. This trend is reflected in the market where there are more and more products suitable for vegans such as, for example, vegetable drinks, tofu, or soy-based foods.

There are more and more products suitable for vegans such as, for example, vegetable drinks, tofu, or soy-based foods.

In fact, soy is one of the foods most consumed by vegans due to its high protein content. It is the legume that provides the most protein and has the least carbohydrates. In addition, it is versatile and easy to find food. In fact, protein should be the first thing to consider when shopping, cooking, and eating.

Legumes, nuts, and mushrooms are other sources of vegetable protein that, along with soybeans, are the basis of a balanced vegan menu. But there are also other products that can complement this type of diet.

Legumes, nuts, and mushrooms are other sources of vegetable protein that, along with soybeans, are the basis of a balanced vegan menu.

1. Chickpea
It is a legume with vitamins B3, C, K, and B9. In addition, it can be consumed both in stews and salads and is the basis of healthy recipes such as hummus.

2. Lentils
They stand out for their content of iron, phosphorus, zinc, magnesium, sodium, potassium, selenium, calcium, and vitamins (B2, B3, B6, B9, A, and E). They can be used both in spoon dishes and in salads.

3. Seitan
It is a wheat protein paste rich in protein and low in fat and carbohydrates. Marinated seitan is used in vegan recipes to simulate the texture of beef steaks.

Seitan is a wheat protein paste rich in protein and low in fat and carbohydrates.

4. Tofu
It is derived from soybeans and is high in iron and calcium. It also contains vitamin B1 and minerals like manganese, selenium, phosphorus, copper, and zinc.

5. Quinoa
Although it has a high level of protein, it depends on the different types that are on the market. Quinoa is an ideal ingredient to complete salads and provides minerals such as calcium, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, and vitamins (C, E, B1, B2, and niacin). In addition, this food is rich in amino acids, which influence brain development, and Omega 6 fats.

Quinoa provides minerals such as calcium, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, and vitamins.

6. Mushrooms
This food provides proteins of vegetable origin, fiber, minerals (magnesium, phosphorus, iodine, calcium, zinc, and potassium), and vitamins A, B1, B2, B3, B5, B9, C, D, and E.

7. Nuts
Walnuts, almonds, and hazelnuts provide fiber, antioxidants, and vitamins B and E.

In addition to these foods, regular guidelines can be followed to maintain a balanced diet:

• Eat at least three servings of fruit a day.
• Two teas or infusions daily.
• A hearty salad, either raw or with co

Peter O Brien

Peter started out his professional life as a restaurant critic but ended up moving to the kitchen, realizing that his passion didn’t only lie in tasting the food, but MAKING it. Follow his delicious recipes, as well as useful articles about the many benefits healthy and delicious food will bring to your life.+ info

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