Seed cycling: is it something worth trying?

Seeds are thought to have a lot of health benefits, so is adding them to each meal worth it?

Seeds are, we know, full of vitamins and other nutrients. But according to a naturopathic practice called seed cycling, they might also have an impact on your hormones. Is it true? How does it work? Is it worth it? Let's find out.

What is seed cycling?

What is seed cycling?

Seed cycling follows the belief that your menstrual cycle can be actually split into two different phases. One phase is called "follicular phase", which starts on the day you get your period (day 1) and ends on day 14. The other one is called "luteal phase", which occurs after ovulation, usually on days 15-28. This is, of course, if you have a regular 28-day cycle.

Seed cycling involves eating different types of seeds, according to the menstrual phase you are in, as followers of this practice believe that seeds might have an impact on hormones and can help you deal with PMS, for example. 

During the follicular phase, you are supposed to eat two tablespoons of flaxseeds and pumpkin seeds in order to boost estrogen production. During the luteal phase, you should eat two tablespoons of sesame and sunflowers seeds, that are thought to help you boost progesterone production. However, science has not been able to prove this one, yet.

If you don't have a 28-day cycle, which is actually pretty common, you can adapt your speed cycling with the lengths that will match yours.

What are the benefits?

What are the benefits?

Besides helping combat PMS symptoms, followers claim that seed cycling can also help with postpartum and it can be of great benefit for menopausal women. It is, supposedly, of great help for those women who suffer hormonal imbalances.

What does science say?

Although there is no conclusive evidence yet, studies have been showing some promising results. In a 2014 clinical trial, 181 women who had cyclical mastalgia (breast pain related to the menstrual cycle) were randomly assigned a daily dose of flaxseed bread (equivalent to 30g of flaxseeds), wheat bread, or an omega-3 supplement. The result? most women who were given the flaxseed bread experienced a great reduction in mastalgia!

Peter O Brien

Peter started out his professional life as a restaurant critic but ended up moving to the kitchen, realizing that his passion didn’t only lie in tasting the food, but MAKING it. Follow his delicious recipes, as well as useful articles about the many benefits healthy and delicious food will bring to your life.+ info

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