Wait! These are the DIY skincare recipes that might hurt you

Wait! These are the DIY skincare recipes that might hurt you

It is not always wise to experiment on your face with anything you have seen on the internet. Keep reading!

Maybe you found a recipe or two for perfect skin. We've seen them too: banana and orange facials, acne-fighting spice masks, olive oil cleansers, and more.

However, whether you are disappointed in the products you find in the pharmacy or you have a beauty emergency, it is not always wise to experiment on your face with anything you have seen on the internet.

Don’t do it! DIY skincare recipes that may hurt you

"I generally prefer to use cosmetic products from the pharmacy, department store, or dermatologist because they are actually tested on the skin and meet certain quality control standards," said New York dermatologist Doris Day. "But if necessary, there are things at home that you can use."

You just have to choose them carefully and learn a little about the past. For many years, people have been using substances like olive oil, yogurt, vinegar, honey, and aloe vera to care for their skin, Day said, and there are no scientific studies that explain why they work.

Think twice before using these ingredients:

The old white vinegar has historically been used as a deodorant and effectively kills body odor, Day said. But it has one big downside: it sucks. "It kills yeasts and certain bacteria" that can cause you to smell bad, "but you will smell like vinegar," he said. Adding essential oil to the vinegar helps, but it doesn't completely remove the salad smell.

 Egg whites can provide a temporary firming effect, providing some relief for oily skin, Day said. But its use carries a risk. "You must be careful when using an egg white mask because sometimes they contain salmonella, and if you accidentally ingest it, you can get it (...) Currently, unless you know where the eggs come from, I would be very careful with that."

If a recipe for a homemade facial scrub contains cinnamon, use it at your own risk, Day said. “I think it would be irritating. You would not achieve a sufficient concentration of cinnamon and you may get blisters (…) It is a spice. If you apply pepper to your skin, you can burn it ”.

Watch out for skincare treatments with Spices

But your skin can benefit from spices in food, he said. Turmeric has anti-inflammatory properties, he said, and he often suggests adding it to food. "However, it will stain your skin orange and you won't get enough absorption to reap the benefits," he said. "Over-the-counter supermarket products that contain turmeric are better for the skin."

Citrus fruits like lemons can irritate the skin, Day said. If you're reading a beauty recipe that calls for you to rub orange juice on your face or lemon wedges on your lips, stop. ("The lips don't have oil glands, so they're especially sensitive," Day said).

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