You can improve your mental health if you cut down your social network use!

You can improve your mental health if you cut down your social network use!

As social media entered the life of everybody in the world, it also brought new problems that need a solution.

Feeling anxious and generally discomforted are, lately, marks of a whole generation. Why is this happening? What can this be related to? Experts turned to social media as a possible factor for all these modern issues we are all struggling with. And the results were surprising (well, not really surprising!).

Teens are starting to believe that Instagram might create a hostile environment.

What's the deal with Instagram and mental health?

A survey made to almost 1,500 teens and young adults stated that Instagram was the worst social media for mental health. Although it got some positive points for being a photo-based platform that allowed people to express themselves, it was associated with high levels of anxiety, depression, bullying, and FOMO, or the “fear of missing out.”

On the other hand, YouTube received the highest marks for health and wellbeing and was the only site that received a net positive score by respondents. Twitter came in second, followed by Facebook and then Snapchat.

The #StatusOfMind survey, published by the United Kingdom’s Royal Society for Public Health, included input from 1,479 young people (ages 14 to 24) from across England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland.
All of the sites received positive scores for self-identity, self-expression, community building, and emotional support, for example. But they all received negative feedback, too.

Seeing friends constantly on holiday or enjoying nights out can make young people feel like they are missing out while others enjoy life.

The #StatusOfMind report states:

“Seeing friends constantly on holiday or enjoying nights out can make young people feel like they are missing out while others enjoy life."

Social media can increase unrealistic expectations of the way life should be, this is dangerous for younger generations as it can lead to anxiety and depression.

To reduce the harmful effects of social media on children and young adults, the Royal Society is calling for social media companies to make changes.

The report recommends the introduction of a pop-up “heavy usage” warning within these apps or websites—something 71% of survey respondents said they’d support.

The Royal Society hopes to empower young adults to use social networks “in a way that protects and promotes their health and wellbeing.”

Victoria Thais

A trip to India was all it took for Victoria to realise that meditation is not a fancy word for sitting around in silence. It truly changed Victoria’s life to a less stressful and more mindful one. Now a freelance consultant and journalist, Victoria joined KOKO to share her knowledge on those little things that are life so much better, and cosier.+ info

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