Longevity genes: do we really inherit longer lives?

Our looks, habits, tastes even eye and hair color come from our parents or grandparents. As far as science is concerned, the same happens with longevity.

The longevity issue has long been in discussion. Maybe because it is everybody´s desire to live a longer and healthy life. According to science, longevity genes do exist, so if our parents live long enough, it may be our case too.

Having long-lived parents means that the rate of cardiovascular disease and tumors will be lower when we reach that same age. Scientists who study the aging process have determined that the age at which parents die can help predict the risk of heart disease and other aspects of heart and circulatory system health in their offspring.

The age at which parents die can help predict the risk of heart disease and other aspects of heart and circulatory system health in their offspring.

Children whose parents had lived longer had less incidence of circulatory diseases, including insufficiency heart disease, stroke, hypertension, high cholesterol levels, and atrial fibrillation are more prone to longer lies. For example, the risk of dying from heart disease is 20% lower for every decade that parents have lived past 70 years. To this lower risk must be added that of cancer, which represents 7% less.

Although these numbers give us hope, we don´t have to forget that the age of the parents is not the only factor that may increase our life expectancy. Leading a healthy life, without smoking or drinking excessively, focusing on working out, and maintaining a healthy weight help and a lot to live longer.

We don´t have to rely only on our genes. Leading a healthy life also contributes to longevity.

There are genetic factors associated with blood pressure, cholesterol levels, and smoking, which can be avoided if we take into account that the age of the parents directly affects the future health of their children. So, the more we know about longevity, the more that we can do to improve our quality of life.

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Victoria Thais

A trip to India was all it took for Victoria to realise that meditation is not a fancy word for sitting around in silence. It truly changed Victoria’s life to a less stressful and more mindful one. Now a freelance consultant and journalist, Victoria joined KOKO to share her knowledge on those little things that are life so much better, and cosier.+ info

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