5 Passive-aggressive common behaviors and how to deal with them

5 Passive-aggressive common behaviors and how to deal with them

Direct aggression is quite easy to identify, but passive-aggressive behaviors sometimes go unnoticed. Here is how to deal with common types of interest aggressions. 

Passive-aggressive behavior is sometimes difficult to spot, it often leaves us feeling confused and upset, but it is difficult to blame it on the aggressor if you can't identify what hurts you.

In short, passive-aggressive behavior is hiding your acts of violence in plain sight, it's giving mixed signals to the receiver, it is also difficult to prove that they've hurt you.

There are different types of passive aggressions, such as guilt-tripping and gaslighting. Today we are dealing with others.

5 Passive-aggressive common behaviors and how to deal with them 

1. Indirect refusals

Saying yes to, let's say, washing the dishes if they don't intend to do it, but making up excuses for doing so, to avoid confrontation, is passive-aggressive behavior. It means that they don't take into account your feelings and ignore your needs.  

Make sure you express how you feel, if the person refuses to take accountability for their actions, just remove yourself from the conversation. 

Indirect refusals ara passive-aggressive behaviors.

2. Patronizing

When someone patronizes you or undermines your intelligence, to make themselves feel superior, it is typical narcissist behavior. Ask for clarification saying something like:

I'm sorry, let me know if I understood what you meant, do you mean that I'm not intelligent enough to do so?"

You won't change the person you are dealing with, but at least you'd be establishing boundaries

When someone patronizes you or undermines your intelligence, to make themselves feel superior, it is typical narcissist behavior.

3. Sarcasm

In certain contexts, it is a way of attacking someone. Instead of actually speaking their mind and saying something that confronts other people, a passive-aggressive person will use sarcasm to get away without ruining a relationship. Again, ask for clarification, you can say:

What do you mean when you say that?"

Sarcasm is sometimes aggression too.

4. Unsolicited opinions or advice

This is one of the most common passive-aggressive behaviors I've had to deal with. Similar to patronizing, and sarcasm, this is also a way of minimizing other people in order to feel superior. Saying things like:

I really think you should go to the gym,"

is aggression. Don't let others do that to you. 

Unsolicited opinions or advice

5. Contemptuos comments

This is when someone disguises a critique in a compliment, saying things such as:

You really look good today," or "what a surprise the food was delicious"

is definitely not a compliment, but a disrespectful comment. As for clarification and establishing boundaries if this happens. 

Aniela Dybiec

Aniela is a writer who loves art, makeup, and magick. She is also an amateur illustrator, a wellness fan and a vegetarian.+ info

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